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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 54-58

Antibiotics in chronic rhinosinusitis: A brief synopsis of literatures


Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Perdana Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Mainul Haque
Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Perdana Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/AIHB.AIHB_75_17

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Sinusitis is an inflammation or else infection of the nose and paranasal sinuses. These cavities are adjacent, and any provocative or transferrable process that touches one also communicates and contaminates others. Consequently, the important entity in this regard to remember that the befitting locution is: rhinosinusitis preferably apart from sinusitis. Chronic sinusitis, more accurately termed chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), is diagnosed more often than acute rhinosinusitis (ARS). Rhinosinusitis is founded on the four key symptoms of 'obstruction, drainage, smell loss and facial pain or pressure' in both ARS and CRS. CRS relates to a progressive upsurge in healthcare exploitation, expenses and healthcare cost remains high. It has been estimated that widespread antimicrobials prescribing and use for CRS cost in the USA was more than the US $150 million to 2.4 billion per year and in the UK, it is about ≤10 million, which finally promotes antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Multiple meta-analyses revealed that the respiratory fluoroquinolones (specifically moxifloxacin, levofloxacin and gatifloxacin) were not able to establish superiority to β-lactams and other classes of antimicrobials for the management of ARS regarding the efficacy and ADR. Thereafter, three additional meta-analyses revealed that there were no corroboration and affirmation of superior efficacy, usefulness and lower adverse effects observed with any definite group of antibiotics in sinusitis. The current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of CRS microbial infection cannot be established, and antimicrobials role should be dedicated in the management ARS episodes or their contagious impediments, and the choice of antimicrobials should be channeled by optimally obtained on endoscopic sinus culture.


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