Advances in Human Biology

CASE REPORT
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 193--196

Early childhood tooth bud removal practice (“Ibyinyo”): preventable dental damage


Nsabimana Evariste1, Muhire Valens1, Uwayezu Donat1, Eleana Stoufi2, Mohammed S Razzaque3 
1 Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, University of Rwanda School of Dentistry, Kigali, Rwanda
2 Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, University of Rwanda School of Dentistry, Kigali, Rwanda; Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
3 Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, University of Rwanda School of Dentistry, Kigali, Rwanda; Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA; Department of Pathology, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Mohammed S Razzaque
Department of Pathology, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA
USA

Tooth bud removal called Ibyinyo is the practice of removing the developing tooth buds, usually done on an infant, typically performed by traditional healers who believe that this practice will reduce fever and diarrhoea in children. This practice is most prevalent in East-African countries, including Rwanda. These procedures are mostly performed in non-sterile conditions using basic sharp instruments. We will discuss the case of a 10-year-old female patient who was presented at the dental clinic, with two malformed permanent canine teeth. Clinical examination revealed malformed enamel and elongated permanent right maxillary canine tooth left mandibular canine tooth with crown malformation. She was also presented with retained (primary) left maxillary lateral incisor tooth and missing left maxillary canine tooth. In addition, the ectopic eruption of left maxillary central incisor tooth and missing permanent right mandibular canine tooth were noted. All these complications resulted from tooth bud removal that the patient had experienced in her early childhood. Her malformed right maxillary and left lower mandibular canine teeth were reshaped, using composite filling materials, to improve her appearance aesthetically. Ibyinyo is preventable damage, done out of ignorance and superstitious practices that can be stopped by growing social awareness. Therefore, educating parents through community-based campaigns on the detrimental consequences of early childhood tooth bud removal through Ibyinyo practice might be helpful to eradicate this harmful and unnecessary practice.


How to cite this article:
Evariste N, Valens M, Donat U, Stoufi E, Razzaque MS. Early childhood tooth bud removal practice (“Ibyinyo”): preventable dental damage.Adv Hum Biol 2020;10:193-196


How to cite this URL:
Evariste N, Valens M, Donat U, Stoufi E, Razzaque MS. Early childhood tooth bud removal practice (“Ibyinyo”): preventable dental damage. Adv Hum Biol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Mar 2 ];10:193-196
Available from: https://www.aihbonline.com/article.asp?issn=2321-8568;year=2020;volume=10;issue=3;spage=193;epage=196;aulast=Evariste;type=0